LEADERSHIP MATTERS by Roger Yancey, D.Min.

One of the best parts of the summer months is the books I can look forward to reading.  Allow me to share a portion of the books that I think you might find of interest as well.  Full confession, the book descriptions are taken from the descriptions you can find on Amazon as are the links to purchase the books if you are interested in doing so.  Whether you read one of these books or others on your own list, allow your summer to be one for personal growth.

Privilege the Text! spans the conceptual gap between biblical text and life application by providing a rigorous theological hermeneutic for preaching.

Kuruvilla describes the theological entity that is the intermediary between ancient text and modern audience, and defines its crucial function in determining valid application. Based on this hermeneutic, he submits a new mode of reading Scripture for preaching: a Christiconic interpretation of the biblical text, a hermeneutically robust way to understand the depiction of the Second Person of the Trinity in Scripture.  https://a.co/d/hOaxNOO

 

A multidisciplinary appraisal of the Pharisees: who they were, what they taught, and how they’ve been understood and depicted throughout history.  For centuries, Pharisees have been well known but little understood—due at least in part to their outsized role in the Christian imagination arising from select negative stereotypes based in part on the Gospels. Yet historians see Pharisees as respected teachers and forward-thinking innovators who helped make the Jewish tradition more adaptable to changing circumstances and more egalitarian in practice. Seeking to bridge this gap, the contributors to this volume provide a multidisciplinary appraisal of who the Pharisees actually were, what they believed and taught, and how they have been depicted throughout history.   https://a.co/d/23oTsLc

Controversy rages on about God’s choosing people for salvation. Are only the few elect? Rather than typically beginning with the preconceptions of systematic theologies, Dr. William Klein takes up this question by searching for a biblical theology of election. He surveys the OT contexts of God’s choosing individuals–prophets, priests, kings–to serve divine purposes, and considers God’s election of the nation of Israel as his special people. The bulk of the study, and the heart of the argument, focus on the New Testament. Klein identifies concepts of election, and relationships between writers in the gospels, the Lucan material, Paul’s writings, and the rest.  https://a.co/d/3fO5RGw

Truly Divine and Truly Human traces the fascinating story of how Christians came to proclaim Jesus of Nazareth as both ‘truly divine’ and ‘truly human.’ It follows the centuries of debate and the Church councils that led up to this proclamation and the years of argument and schism that followed. This declaration has remained central to Christianity down the centuries and an appreciation of how it was made is crucial not only for an understanding of Christian history but also for an understanding of Christian identity today. Between 325 and 787 A.D. seven ecumenical councils took place in the early church. This book discusses what they had to say about Jesus Christ in the context of the developing Trinitarian theology of the time.  https://a.co/d/6ZTmWg5

What to do when they say they’re Christian but don’t know Jesus? Whether it’s the Christmas and Easter Christians or the faithful church attenders whose hearts are cold toward the Lord, we’ve all encountered cultural Christians. They’d check the Christian box on a survey, they’re fine with church, but the truth is, they’re far from God. So how do we bring Jesus to this overlooked mission field? The Unsaved Christian equips you to confront cultural Christianity with honesty, compassion, and grace, whether you’re doing it from the pulpit or the pews. If you’ve ever felt stuck or unsure how to minister to someone who identifies as Christian but still needs Jesus, this book is for you.  https://a.co/d/gaBgziz

A revelatory account of how Christian monks identified distraction as a fundamental challenge―and how their efforts to defeat it can inform ours, more than a millennium later.  The digital era is beset by distraction, and it feels like things are only getting worse. At times like these, the distant past beckons as a golden age of attention. We fantasize about escaping our screens. We dream of recapturing the quiet of a world with less noise. We imagine retreating into solitude and singlemindedness, almost like latter-day monks. But although we think of early monks as master concentrators, a life of mindfulness did not, in fact, come to them easily.  https://a.co/d/6vj6dvC

Enjoy your summer reading!

 

In Kingdom service,

Executive Director, AMS